Lundi 03 octobre 2016,  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Salle S/115

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 ou 47

Olivier CHARLOT
(Université Cergy Pontoise, ThEMA)
avec Pierre CAHUC (CREST), Franck MALHERBET (CREST), Hélène BENGHALEM (CREST) et Emeline LIMON (ThEMA)
Taxation of Temporary Jobs : Good Intentions with Bad Outcomes?
This paper analyzes the consequences of the taxation of temporary jobs recently introduced in several European countries to induce …firms to create more open-ended contracts and to increase the duration of jobs. The estimation of a job search and matching model on French data shows that the taxation of temporary jobs does not reach its objectives: it reduces the mean duration of jobs, decreases job creation, employment and welfare of unemployed workers. We …find that a reform introducing an open-ended contract without layoff costs for separations occuring at short tenure would have opposite effects.
Advertisements

Lundi 19 septembre 2016,  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Salle S/115

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 ou 47

Morgane LAOUENAN
avec Etienne Wasmer (Sciences-Po) et Olivier Gergaud (KEDGE)
“A Brief History of Human Time :
Exploring a database of “notable people” ”
This paper describes a database of 1,243,776 notable people and 7,184,575 locations (Geolinks) associated with them throughout human history (3000BCE-2015AD). We first describe in details the various approaches and procedures adopted to extract the relevant information from their Wikipedia biographies and then analyze the database. Eight main facts emerge.
1. There has been an exponential growth over time of the database, with more than 60% of notable people still living in 2015, with the exception of a relative decline of the cohort born in the XVIIth century and a local minimum between 1645 and 1655.
2. The average lifespan has increased by 20 years, from 60 to 80 years, between the cohort born in 1400AD and the one born in 1900AD.
3. The share of women in the database follows a U-shape pattern, with a minimum in the XVIIth century and a maximum at 25% for the most recent cohorts.
4. The fraction of notable people in governance occupations has decreased while the fraction in occupations such as arts, literature/media and sports has increased over the centuries.
5. Since 1800, the share of people from Europe and the U.S. in the database declines, the number of people from Asia and the Southern Hemisphere grows to reach 20% of the database in 2000.
6. The average distance between places of birth and death follows a U-shape pattern: the median distance was 316km before 500AD, 100km between 500 and 1500AD, and has risen continuously since then.
7. Individuals with the highest levels of visibility tend to be more distant from their birth place, with a median distance of 785km for the top percentile as compared to 389km for the top decile and 176km overall.
8. In all occupations, there has been a rise in international mobility since 1960. The fraction of locations in a country different from the place of birth went from 15% in 1955 to 35% after 2000.