Monday, December 3d 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 116

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 or 47

Stefanie HALLER
(University College Dublin)
with Ragnhild Balsvik (Norwegian School of Economics) & Doireann Fitzgerald (Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis)
Greenfield Hires

Abstract: We investigate the possibility of short-run spillovers from foreign greenfield entry that work through the labor market. We first show that new hires at foreign-owned entrants are positively selected on observables. Moreover, conditional on observables, new hires to foreign-owned entrants earned a positive wage premium in their previous job, consistent with additional positive selection on unobservables. We find evidence that losing managers to a greenfield entrant generates positive wage spillovers for workers at sending plants, whereas losing technicians generates negative wage spillovers.

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Monday, November 19th 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 116

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 or 47

Léa MARCHAL
(Kiel Institute for the World Economy)
with Clément Nedoncelle (INRA, AgroParisTech)
Immigrants and Firm Export Performance Across Destinations

Abstract: This paper investigates the export-enhancing effect of immigrant workers at the firm-level and explores how this effect varies across occupations. We use a dataset of French manufacturing firms from 1997 to 2009 and address the problem of endogenous employment choice and selection bias using an IV strategy and a shift-share instrument. Our results show that immigrants in both low- and high-skilled occupations foster exports at both extensive and intensive margins. This effect is spread over all export destinations and goes beyond a destination-specific effect usually put forward in the literature.

Monday, November 5th 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 114

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 or 47

Claire GIORDANO
(Banca d’Italia)
with Michael Fidora and Martin Schmitz (European Central Bank)
Doomed to disequilibrium? An assessment of real exchange rate misalignments in the euro area

Abstract: Building upon a behavioural equilibrium exchange rate (BEER) model, estimated at a quarterly frequency since 1999 on a broad sample of 57 countries, the paper assesses whether both the size and persistence of real effective exchange rate misalignments from the levels implied by economic fundamentals have been affected by the adoption of a single currency. A comparison of real misalignments across different country groupings shows they are smaller in the euro area than in its main trading partners. However, in the euro area real disequilibria are also more persistent, although after the global financial crisis the reactivity of real exchange rates to past misalignments increased, and therefore the persistence decreased. In the absence of the nominal adjustment channel, an improvement in the quality of regulation and institutions is found to reduce the persistence of real exchange rate misalignments.

Monday, October 8th 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 114

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 ou 47

José de Sousa
(Paris Sud)
with Muriel Niederle (Stanford)

 

Trickle-Down Affirmative Action: A Case Study in Chess

Abstract: Vertical gender segregation is one of the most stubborn features of labor markets: high-ranking positions are primarily held by men in Business, Politics and Science. Can we design an institution, an affirmative action, to erase this segregation? We try to answer this question by investigating the effects of a clear affirmative action for women, where we have a good measure of “ability” even of people who did not directly benefit from the action. Chess, which is grappling with a huge vertical segregation problem, offers a special and unique opportunity to investigate the effect of an affirmative action, because we have a clear idea how good someone is. France introduced an affirmative action (AA) for women in its club competitions in the beginning of the nineties, which helps us to answer key questions. How much does the AA benefit the selected pool? Does the AA trickle-down? In other words, does it lead to higher investment (benefits) of a whole group and not just those selected?

Monday, September 24th 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room S/2

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 ou 47

Stefania Marcassa
(Université de Cergy-Pontoise)
with Alessandra Fogli (Minnessota FED)

 

The Geography of Social Change

Abstract: The early decline in American fertility is a puzzle in terms of both magnitude and timing. We show that fertility was lower in counties characterized by higher outward migration, especially migration towards the western frontier. Our theory is based on the diffusion of new family values governing intergenerational responsibilities and behavior with respect to saving and fertility. Increased economic opportunities in the West, as higher wages and land availability, provided incentives to migrate. This phenomenon lowered expected transfers from children, and incentivized precautionary savings of parents.

Monday, June 25th 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room S/3

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 ou 47

Jérôme Valette
(CERDI, Université Clermont Auvergne)
with Frédéric Docquier (FNRS & IRES, Université Catholique de Louvain), Riccardo Turati (IRES, Université Catholique de Louvain), and Chrysovalantis Vasilakis (Bangor Business School, United Kingdom)
Birthplace Diversity and Economic Growth: Evidence from the US States in the Post-World War II Period

Abstract: This paper empirically revisits the impact of birthplace diversity on economic growth. We use panel data on US states over the 1960-2010 period. This rich data set allows us to better deal with endogeneity issues and to conduct a large set of robustness checks. Our results suggest that diversity among college-educated immigrants positively affects economic growth. We provide converging evidence pointing at the existence of skill complementarities between workers trained in different countries. These synergies result in better labor market outcomes for native workers and in higher productivity in the R&D sector. The gains from diversity are maximized when immigrants originate from economically or culturally distant countries (but not both), and when they acquired part of their secondary education abroad and their college education in the US. Overall, a 10% increase in high-skilled diversity raises GDP per capita by about 6%. On the contrary, low-skilled diversity has insignificant effects.

 

Monday, June 11th 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room S/3

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 ou 47

Manuel Bagues
(Aalto University)
with Pamela Campa (Calgary University)
Can Gender Quotas in Candidate Lists Empower Women? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design

Abstract: We provide a comprehensive analysis of the short- and medium-term effects of gender quotas in candidate lists using evidence from local elections in Spain. In the context of a closed list system with proportional representation, quotas were introduced in 2007 in municipalities with more than 5,000 inhabitants, and were extended in 2011 to municipalities with more than 3,000 inhabitants. Using a Regression Discontinuity Design, we find that quotas increased the share of women in candidate lists by around 8 p.p. and among council members by 4 p.p. However, within three rounds of elections, we do not observe any significant variation in voting behavior, the quality of politicians, the probability that women reach powerful positions such as party leader or mayor, or the size and composition of public finances. Overall, our analysis suggests that quotas in candidate lists fail to have a relevant impact.