Monday, February 18th, 2019 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room S3

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 or 47

Ugo GRAGNOLATI
(CES)
with Alessandro Nuvolari (Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies) 
Innovation, Localized Knowledge Spillovers and the British Industrial Revolution, 1700-1850

Abstract: This paper estimates the determinants of the localization of patent inventors during the British industrial revolution. The location of innovative activities is reconstructed using the stated residence of patentees at the time of filing. We estimate a discrete choice model that allows to empirically disentangle the role of localized externalities vis-à-vis other geographical advantages, and we find the former to be a key driver of the geography of innovative activities during the British industrial revolution. In a broader perspective, our findings suggest that, despite the growth of publications devoted to scientific and technological matters, a significant component of the body of knowledge underlying innovative activities remained irreducibly “tacit” and “sticky”.

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Monday, February 4th 2019 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room S3

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 or 47

Michal BURZYNSKI
(LISER)
with Pawel Gola (BI Norwegian Business School) 
Mexican Migration to the US: Selection, Sorting and Matching

Abstract: We develop a model of international migration in which heterogeneous workers self-select into domestic and foreign labor markets, and match with productivity- differentiated firms operating on the international goods market. Due to worker-firm matching, low- and high-skilled workers are complements. In a numerical exercise, we quantify the effects of Mexican migration to the US on the distributions of wages in both countries. We find that Mexican migration depresses the wages of below- median US workers. However, their losses are small, and can be fully compensated with a transfer financed by a lump-sum tax on Mexican immigrants of about a dollar per day.

Monday, January 21st 2019 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room S3

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 or 47

Gianluca OREFICE
(CEPII)
with Giovanni Peri (UC Davis) 
Immigration and Worker-Firm matching

Abstract: The matching between firm and workers is an important mechanism affecting average productivity and its dispersion. Denser and more diversified labor markets may encourage positive assortative matching which in turn increases average productivity, average wages and profits in the area. We think of immigration as increasing the range of skills and the “thickness” of local labor markets. This may increase the returns to doing screening for firms, which increases the extent of positive assortative matching. Using French matched employer-employee (DADS) data we document a novel fact about the hiring decision of French firms. Positive changes in the local supply of immigrant workers improves the matching between workers and firms captured by a stronger rank correlation in the firm-worker types. We show that this association may be causal. This is a further channel through which immigrants may be beneficial to local productivity and it contributes to explain the lack of negative effects from immigration on wage of natives.

Monday, December 3rd 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 116

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 or 47

Stefanie HALLER
(University College Dublin)
with Ragnhild Balsvik (Norwegian School of Economics) & Doireann Fitzgerald (Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis)
Greenfield Hires

Abstract: We investigate the possibility of short-run spillovers from foreign greenfield entry that work through the labor market. We first show that new hires at foreign-owned entrants are positively selected on observables. Moreover, conditional on observables, new hires to foreign-owned entrants earned a positive wage premium in their previous job, consistent with additional positive selection on unobservables. We find evidence that losing managers to a greenfield entrant generates positive wage spillovers for workers at sending plants, whereas losing technicians generates negative wage spillovers.

Monday, November 19th 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 116

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 or 47

Léa MARCHAL
(Kiel Institute for the World Economy)
with Clément Nedoncelle (INRA, AgroParisTech)
Immigrants and Firm Export Performance Across Destinations

Abstract: This paper investigates the export-enhancing effect of immigrant workers at the firm-level and explores how this effect varies across occupations. We use a dataset of French manufacturing firms from 1997 to 2009 and address the problem of endogenous employment choice and selection bias using an IV strategy and a shift-share instrument. Our results show that immigrants in both low- and high-skilled occupations foster exports at both extensive and intensive margins. This effect is spread over all export destinations and goes beyond a destination-specific effect usually put forward in the literature.

Monday, November 5th 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 114

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 or 47

Claire GIORDANO
(Banca d’Italia)
with Michael Fidora and Martin Schmitz (European Central Bank)
Doomed to disequilibrium? An assessment of real exchange rate misalignments in the euro area

Abstract: Building upon a behavioural equilibrium exchange rate (BEER) model, estimated at a quarterly frequency since 1999 on a broad sample of 57 countries, the paper assesses whether both the size and persistence of real effective exchange rate misalignments from the levels implied by economic fundamentals have been affected by the adoption of a single currency. A comparison of real misalignments across different country groupings shows they are smaller in the euro area than in its main trading partners. However, in the euro area real disequilibria are also more persistent, although after the global financial crisis the reactivity of real exchange rates to past misalignments increased, and therefore the persistence decreased. In the absence of the nominal adjustment channel, an improvement in the quality of regulation and institutions is found to reduce the persistence of real exchange rate misalignments.

Monday, October 8th 2018 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 114

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 27, 83 ou 47

José de Sousa
(Paris Sud)
with Muriel Niederle (Stanford)

 

Trickle-Down Affirmative Action: A Case Study in Chess

Abstract: Vertical gender segregation is one of the most stubborn features of labor markets: high-ranking positions are primarily held by men in Business, Politics and Science. Can we design an institution, an affirmative action, to erase this segregation? We try to answer this question by investigating the effects of a clear affirmative action for women, where we have a good measure of “ability” even of people who did not directly benefit from the action. Chess, which is grappling with a huge vertical segregation problem, offers a special and unique opportunity to investigate the effect of an affirmative action, because we have a clear idea how good someone is. France introduced an affirmative action (AA) for women in its club competitions in the beginning of the nineties, which helps us to answer key questions. How much does the AA benefit the selected pool? Does the AA trickle-down? In other words, does it lead to higher investment (benefits) of a whole group and not just those selected?