Monday, January 18th, 2021 – 1pm-2pm

Online Seminar (ZOOM)

Link: https://zoom.univ-paris1.fr/j/93108492223?pwd=Q1V0bHNveDdOdHFTUmpDSTNCM1hPdz09

Meeting ID: 931 0849 2223
Meeting Password: 036385

Mathieu Parenti
(Université libre de Bruxelles, ECARES and CEPR)

co-authored with Sébastien Laffitte, Baptiste Souillard and Farid Toubal

Quantifying the Effects of International Tax Reforms

Many reforms have been proposed to ensure that multinational firms pay their income taxes where they carry on their activities. Assessing ex-ante their impact requires a counterfactual analysis that takes into account the level of corporate taxation and the set of factors influencing the location of sales, production, and profits of multinational firms. We build a quantitative general equilibrium model featuring multinational activities and international corporate taxation. The model is calibrated using recent data on bilateral trade of goods and services, multinational sales, and profits for 40 countries, including 7 major tax havens. Specifically, we propose a new methodology to infer the amount of bilateral profits shifted by multinational corporations. The model predicts the change in the relative attractiveness of countries, the variation of tax revenues and inequalities within countries, and the world-level efficiency induced by the implementation of a broad range of different reforms. These include scenarios that either reallocate taxing rights across countries and/or address profit shifting to entities subject to no or very low taxation. We show that reforms that redistribute taxing rights lead to more unequal gains that those which aim directly at curbing profit shifting. We also study the optimal parameters (minimum tax rate and allocation key) in different corporate tax configurations.

Monday, January 4th, 2021 – 1pm-2pm

Online Seminar (ZOOM)

Link: https://zoom.univ-paris1.fr/j/93164156180?pwd=SjlnWVJPTEJ3cEx3YWFpeWJEM2w1UT09

Meeting ID: 931 6415 6180
Meeting Password: 863276

Jérôme Valette
(CES and Paris 1 Uni)

co-authored with Sekou Keita and Thomas Renault

The Usual Suspects. Offenders’ Origin, Media.
Reporting and Natives’ Attitudes Towards Immigration

This paper analyses how media reporting policies on crime impact natives’ attitudes towards immigration. We depart from most of the existing literature by investigating the content of crime-related articles instead of their coverage. Specifically, we use a radical change in local media reporting on crime in Germany, following hundreds of sexual assaults in Cologne on the 2015-2016 New Year’s Eve, as a natural experiment. This unique framework allows us to estimate whether systematically disclosing the origin of criminals affects natives’ attitudes towards immigration. Using individual survey data collected between January 2014 and December 2018 from the German Socio-Economic Panel and analysing more than 545,000 crime-related articles in German newspapers, and data on their diffusion across the country, we find that systematically mentioning the origin of criminals, especially when offenders are natives, significantly reduces natives’ worries about immigration.

Monday, December 7th, 2020 – 13:00 – 14:00

Online Seminar (ZOOM)

Link: https://zoom.univ-paris1.fr/j/91781478663?pwd=OWdnampvTFF4U1N0a1BBcDZnTHdFUT09

Meeting ID: 917 8147 8663
Meeting Password: 367455

Federico Trionfetti
(Aix-Marseille University)
co-authored with Rocco Rante (Louvre Museum).

The Size and Geographical Distribution of Cities: Evidence from the X century.

Abstract: Using archaeological data of the ‘oasis’ of Bukhara in the X century we search for determents of the size and geographical distribution of cities. We use a simple model of location choice. We find that centrality and market access play a significant role while path dependence appears to be insignificant.

Monday, November 9th, 2020 –  13:00 – 14:00

Online Seminar (ZOOM)

Link: https://zoom.univ-paris1.fr/j/98489062558?pwd=MDlhYnBrWXFORUR3SThQdTZFSnViUT09

Meeting ID: 942 8770 9536
Meeting Password: 678948

Elie Murard
(IZA – Institute of Labor Economics )
co-authored with Simone Bertoli (CERDI) and Elsa Gautrain (CERDI)

Changing Living Arrangements and the Effects of Migration on the Left Behind in Mexico.

Abstract: We provide evidence that the occurrence of an international migration episode is associated with a variation in the living arrangements of the household members who remain behind. The migration of a married Mexican man typically induces his wife to join the household of her own parents, a change that is at odds with the patrilocal norm that prevails in the country. This change in living arrangements produces two relevant implications for the analysis of the effects produced by migration on the individuals left behind: it leads to attrition in longitudinal household surveys, so that econometric analyses become uninformative about the effects on the left behind who adjusted their living arrangements, and it gives rise to a relevant heterogeneity in these effects.

Monday, October 26th, 2020 –  13:00 – 14:00

Online Seminar (ZOOM)

Link: https://zoom.univ-paris1.fr/j/98489062558?pwd=MDlhYnBrWXFORUR3SThQdTZFSnViUT09

Meeting ID: 984 8906 2558
Meeting Password: 973593

Toman Barsbai
(University of Bristol)
co-authored with Andreas Pondorfer.

Animal Spirits: The Natural Geography of Economic Behavior.

Abstract: We use insights from behavioral ecology and propose the behavior of wild animals as an exogenous measure of the behavioral constraints of geography. We construct a global grid-cell database of average animal behavior and analyze the spatial correlation between animal and human behavior in three important economic domains: future orientation, geographic mobility, and gender roles. Animal behavior significantly predicts human behavior in all three domains. The spatial correlation holds for hunter-gatherer and modern societies (across and within countries) and also extends to second-generation immigrants. Our results suggest that geography has persistently shaped human behavior with implications for comparative economic development.

Monday, September 28th, 2020 –  13:00 – 14:00

Online Seminar (ZOOM)

Link:  https://zoom.univ-paris1.fr/j/96621514115?pwd=R0xiT3VsM3dEVFVLaHhjVjRweFZ1QT09

Meeting ID: 961 0254 1247
Meeting Password: 
822355
Léa Marchal
(CES)
co-autored with Giulia Sabbadini (Graduate Institute, Geneva)

When Immigrants Meet Exporters: A Reassessment of the Immigrant-Native Wage Gap.

Abstract: This paper studies the relationship between firm export activity and the immigrant-native wage gap. To do so, we use French employer-employee data from 2005 to 2012 for the manufacturing sector which allows one to follow employees over time. In line with previous evidence, we find that exporters pay higher wages and that immigrants earn less than natives. New to this literature, we find that the wage discount of immigrant workers is lower for exporters, and that this result is driven by workers employed in white-collar positions. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that immigrant workers capture an informational rent because they provide exporters with valuable information to access distant and complex foreign markets. We provide evidence for this mechanism by studying how the wage discount of immigrants varies with the complexity of the export activity of the firm approximated by the number of products, the number of destinations and the number of product-destination served by the firm.

Monday, September 14th, 2020 –  13:00 – 14:00

Online Seminar (ZOOM)

Link: https://zoom.univ-paris1.fr/j/96621514115?pwd=R0xiT3VsM3dEVFVLaHhjVjRweFZ1QT09

Meeting ID: 966 2151 4115

Meeting Password: 718641

Clément Bosquet
(CES)
co-autored with Pierre-Philippe Combes, Emeric Henry and Thierry Mayer

Peer Effects in Academic Research: Senders and Receivers.

Abstract: Using an instrument based on a national contest in France determining researchers’ location, we find evidence of peer effects in academia, when focusing on precise groups of senders (producing the spillovers) and receivers (benefiting from the spillovers), defined based on field of specialisation, gender and age. These peer effects are shown to exist even outside formal co-authorship relationships. Furthermore, the match between the characteristics of senders and receivers plays a critical role. In particular, men benefit a lot from peer effects provided by men, while all other types of gender combinations produce spillovers twice as small.

 

 

 

Monday, June 15th, 2020 –  13:00 – 14:00

Online Seminar (ZOOM)

Link: https://zoom.univ-paris1.fr/j/92070008929?pwd=Snh5UUF1KzVvak5QclZPMkIyMTh6dz09

Meeting Password: 791961

Johannes Boehm
(Sciences Po Paris)
co-autored with Swati Dhingra and John Morrow

The Comparative Advantage of Firms.

Abstract: Multiproduct firms dominate production, and their product turnover contributes substantially to aggregate growth. Theories propose that multiproduct firms grow by diversifying into products which need the same know-how or capabilities, but are less clear on what these capabilities are. Input-output tables show firms co-produce in industries that share intermediate inputs, suggesting input capabilities drive multiproduct production patterns. We provide evidence for this in Indian manufacturing: the similarity of a firm’s input mix to an industry’s input mix predicts entry into that industry. We identify the direction of causality from the removal of size-based entry barriers in input markets which made firms more likely to enter industries that were similar in input use to their initial input mix. We rationalize this finding with a model of industry choice and economies of scope to estimate the importance of input capabilities in determining comparative advantage. Complementarities driven by input capabilities make a firm on average 5% (and up to 15%) more likely to produce in an industry. Entry barriers in input markets constrained the comparative advantage of firms and were equivalent to a 10.5 percentage point tariff on inputs.

 

 

 

Monday, March 9th, 2020 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 19

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 22.

Riccardo Turati
(UCLouvain and IRES)

Network-based connectedness and the diffusion of cultural traits.

This paper empirically investigates the impact of network-based connectedness on the diffusion of cultural traits. Using Gallup World Poll data on 148 countries on individual connectedness, opinions and beliefs, we find that natives who have a connection abroad are associated with higher levels of social behavior, religiosity and gender-egalitarian attitudes. Due to the endogenous nature of the variables, we strongly mitigate the threat of selection into connectedness by showing robust estimates even after controlling for broad measure of connectedness and performing propensity score and covariate matching techniques. Statistical tests are carefully implemented to quantify the selection threat of unobserved factors, which appears negligible. Our evidence shows that connectedness leads to cultural convergence across regions, while increases cultural heterogeneity within regions. Exploring the mechanisms by which these effects occur, we provide evidence that the effects are precisely estimated among less educated natives and that connectedness affects economic outcomes through remittances. We estimate differential cultural effects based on the connection’s country of residence, suggesting a destination-specific transfer of norms. Overall, the effects on social behavior are sizeable at the global level, once simulations based on estimated coefficients are performed. Although robust and certainly not negligible, gender-egalitarian and pro-religiosity effects of connectedness are limited.

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Monday, February 24th, 2020 –  13:00 – 14:00

Maison des Sciences Économiques, Room 19

 Maison des Sciences Économiques, 106-112 bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Métro 5 Campo Formio, bus 57, 67, 22.

Ariell Reshef
(CNRS, PSE, Université Paris 1 and CEPII)
with Gianluca Santoni (CEPII).

Are Your Labor Shares Set in Beijing? The View through the Lens of Global Value Chains.

We study the evolution of labor shares in 1995-2014 while taking into account international trade based on value added concepts. On average, the decline in labor shares (starting around 1980) accelerates in 2001-2007, after which labor shares recover somewhat. In contrast, skilled labor shares consistently increase. The acceleration in the decline in labor shares is associated with increased intensity of intermediate input exporting; this manifests in a sharp increase in the foreign component in upstreamness of industries and countries in global value chains (GVCs). China’s global integration accounts for much of this. Declines in the price of investment together with capital-skill complementarity can explain both the consistent increase in skilled labor shares and the reversal of trend in overall labor shares. Compared to shares in GDP, labor shares in gross national product (GNP) are higher in countries with positive net FDI positions; the uneven spread of multinational activity contributes to greater inequality through this channel.

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